Tag: Logical Data Model

What Are Conceptual, Logical, and Physical Data Models?

Depending on the purpose, we may need to create either a conceptual, logical, or physical data model. Find out the differences and use cases for each one. Data modeling implies identifying and defining entities and their relationships for a business solution. It requires a good understanding of the desired business outcome and is the foundation for creating a robust software solution. The different model types (conceptual, logical, and physical) have different levels of detail and are used at different stages of the software development process.

Vertabelo Feature: Amazon Redshift Support in Vertabelo

Find out how to design an Amazon Redshift schema in Vertabelo. Thanks to increasing volumes of data, analytical databases like Amazon Redshift are gaining market. We introduced Redshift support at the end of 2019; in this article, we will explain how to design a Redshift data model using Vertabelo. How to Create a Model Let's start with the data model creation process. To create a Redshift schema, please: Log into Vertabelo and click on Create new document.

How to Generate a Physical Diagram from a Logical Diagram in Vertabelo

Have you finished preparing your logical data model in Vertabelo? Awesome! In this article, we'll show you how to generate the physical data model from the logical model in Vertabelo. It’s just a few clicks away. Ready? Let's dive into it. Quick Intro In this article, we'll deal with a slightly modified version of Microsoft's Northwind Database. We often use it in our LearnSQL courses, such as Customer Behavior Analysis in SQL.

Vertabelo Features: Logical Diagrams

Find out how to create logical data models in Vertabelo! If you have some experience with physical diagrams, this will be as easy as pie. There are three different levels of data models: conceptual, logical, and physical. Of these, the conceptual model is the most abstract, and the logical model has a few more technical details. The physical model has all the details of the physical database, such as data types (integer, decimal, money, varchar, etc.

What a Concept! Is Logical Data Modeling Obsolete?

When databases were sized in megabytes rather than petabytes, their design was a well-defined discipline of data analysis and implementation. A progression of modeling steps – from conceptual and logical through relational and/or physical – promised successful deployment. But as we passed more orders of magnitude in data volume, we seemed to stop seeking modeling approaches to manage that volume. So the question arises: Is logical data modeling obsolete?